CFP: The Social History of Money and Credit

18 10 2013

Richard Robinson Business History Workshop
Portland State University
May 22-24 2014 Portland, OR

The Richard Robinson Business History Workshop at Portland State University
extends a call for papers concerning the social and cultural history of
money and credit. We are interested in papers that engage the meanings and uses of financial instruments in daily life as well as in the popular
imagination. Papers concerning the social history of money and credit in
non-Western contexts are particularly encouraged. Papers from all
disciplines are welcome so long as they address topics historically. Topics
proposed may include but are not limited to:

• The cultural history of currencies, including contested and alternative
currencies
• Credit and debt as social relations, and the social significance of
business contacts and credit networks
• Insolvency, bankruptcy, seizure of merchandise and imprisonment for debt
• Microcredit and informal credit instruments
• Credibility and personal reputation
• The politics of the bond market and the credibility of the state
• The development of institutionalized credit markets
• Money and credit in commercial law
• The meaning of money and credit in colonial, postcolonial, or
transnational settings

Those interested in presenting should submit a one-page paper abstract and CV to the Workshop coordinators Erika Vause (Saint Xavier University), Thomas Luckett (Portland State University) or Chia Yin Hsu (Portland State University) at historyworkshop@pdx.edu by December 6, 2013.

Accepted presenters will be notified by January 17, 2014. We plan to include 10-15 papers to be pre-circulated and discussed in plenary sessions on Friday, May 23, and Saturday, May 24. There will also be a public keynote address on the evening of Thursday, May 22.

We have funding to cover hotel expenses and partial travel reimbursements for up to about ten participants. There is no registration cost.

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One response

18 10 2013
Angus Cameron

Reblogged this on Xenotopia.

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